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Tash Rabat

Kyrgyzstan 2012

One of those places that you must visit! I took in a visit when on my way from Narin (in Kyrgyzstan) to Kashgar (in China) during my Silk Route Journey in 2012.

Tash Rabat is a historic caravanserai located in the At-Bashi District of Naryn Province in Kyrgyzstan. It is a well-preserved stone building that served as a resting place for travelers on the ancient Silk Road.

The Tash Rabat caravanserai is believed to have been constructed in the 15th century, although its exact origins and purpose remain somewhat uncertain. It is built in a remote and mountainous area, which suggests that it may have served as a shelter for merchants and travelers crossing the treacherous Tian Shan Mountains.

The structure itself is a large, domed building made of stone, with thick walls that provide protection from the elements and potential dangers. It consists of 31 rooms arranged around a central courtyard, with a smaller chamber on the second floor. The walls are about a meter thick, and the domed roof is supported by a central pillar. The design is characteristic of Central Asian architecture.

Tash Rabat is now a popular tourist attraction in Kyrgyzstan, attracting visitors who are interested in history, architecture, and the Silk Road. The surrounding area offers beautiful landscapes, and the site provides an opportunity to explore the ancient trade routes and imagine the lives of the travelers who once passed through this caravanserai.

Posted by TheJohnsons 12:06 Archived in Kyrgyzstan Tagged #travel #tourism #tourist #ancient #summer #history #mountains #green #landscape #nature #vacation #river #architecture #road #rural #view #walk #ruins #mountain #sky #blue #asia #asian #traditional #landmark #building #silk #heritage #outdoor #stone #central #wall #kyrgyzstan #rabat #caravanserai #naryn #kyrgyz #tash #caravan #tian #shan #valley #torugart #past #pass #at bashy #kirgizia #bashy #silkroad #range

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